Monthly Archives: November 2012

Lincoln

I’m a fan of Tony Kushner, so I was interested to see what kind of a script he’d produce for Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln. A better title would be St. Lincoln, since only rarely do we get a real feel for Lincoln the man, mostly it’s Lincoln the icon. Actually, a more appropriate title would be […]

Sociopathic salesmen

The final author in my 20th Century American Drama class is Eugene O’Neill.  We’re studying The Iceman Cometh, a play I’ve never seen. When the Hickey appears, and it turns out he’s a salesman, my thoughts turned from theatre to sociology. What does it say about American culture that three of the top dramas of […]

Ionesco

I had the good fortune to see an excellent production of The Lesson about a month ago at Tulane University, and it got me set up for an Ionesco binge.  I read The Bald Soprano, Rhinoceros, watched the Zero Mostel/Gene Wilder adaptation of the latter, and read several of his essays in Notes and Counter Notes. […]

Tycho Brahe

I’ve had a minor obsession with Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe for some time now. I decided to write a play about him, and this summer in preparation, I visited his birthplace, the island of Hven where his observatory was located, and his tomb in the Tyn Church in Prague. Tycho’s body has exhumed in 2010 […]

After too many post-election stories…

Looking at Polling Data after Loss, Republicans Embrace Science Amalgamated Press After exit polls revealed the demographic realities of the Obama re-election, top GOP officials have announced their intent to embrace science in hopes of changing the result of future elections. When asked if this meant giving up their doctrinaire positions on such topics as […]

Navel gazing

There’s a bit of a danger in so-called critical analysis: you can spend a lot of time developing theories on “meaning” without ever going anywhere. Today, my American drama class spent 90 minutes discussing a single line of stage directions. Not even an entire sentence. Now the subject of this discussion was Gertrude Stein, who […]

Survival

If a dollar was donated every time the “death of theatre” was discussed, I’m sure there’d be a hefty actor’s retirement fund available somewhere, but the question of survival really has to be addressed in a month in which we see  two of the generation’s best playwrights in the credits. By this Friday, the multiplex […]